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Gold Award Girl Scouts: Issues of the world, meet your match.

Gold Award Girl Scouts

Issues of the world, meet your match. 

Gold Award Girl Scouts don't just change the world for the better, they change it for good. The Gold Award is earned by girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership in developing sustainable solutions to local, national, and global challenges. Since 1916, Girl Scouts have answered the call to drive lasting, impactful change. The Gold Award is the mark of the truly remarkable.

You can pursue your Girl Scout Gold Award if:
 
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You're in high school (ninth through twelfth grade, or equivalent) 
 

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You're registered as a Girl Scout Senior or Girl Scout Ambassador
 

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You have completed two Senior or Ambassador Journeys OR earned the Girl Scout Silver Award and completed a Journey
 

All Girl Scouts must complete a council Gold Award training before submitting a proposal.

Go for Gold

Training & Resources

Ready to get started? Check out these resources & guidelines and the Getting Started with the Gold Award activity page.

All Girl Scouts who would like to earn their Gold Award are required to complete training before submitting a Project Proposal.

We know Senior and Ambassador Girl Scouts are busy, so we've updated our training to be all online. You can complete it at your own pace, when it fits your schedule!

Click here to access the training

Have questions? Contact Maggie at mewan@girlscoutsalaska.org

GSUSA has compiled a YouTube playlist, Go for the Gold: Tips from Gold Award Girl Scouts, to support Girl Scout Senior and Ambassadors working on their Gold Award proposal or looking to get started on it. The playlist guides girls through the seven steps to earning the Gold Award—delivered straight from a few exceptional Gold Award Girl Scouts—and they’ll continue to add to it. 

Gold Award Steps

Identify an issue. Choose a community issue or need you care about.

Investigate. Conduct research and learn all about the issue.

Get help and build your team. You are the leader of your project, but you are required to have others to support you, and your team should expand beyond your family and troop.

Create a plan. Identify the root cause of the issue, determine your project goals, and create solutions to the issue.

Present your plan.  Submit your Gold Award Project Proposal for approval using GoGold. All project proposals must be approved before a Gold Award plan can be initiated. After your proposal is submitted, you'll be invited to be meet by phone with the Gold Award Committee

Take Action. Lead your team and carry out your plan. Be sure to take notes, pictures, and videos along the way!

Educate and Inspire. Put together your Final Report, submit it for approval, and tell your story and share your impact!

Developing a Project Proposal
Before starting on your project proposal, review these Tips for Success and the Gold Award Guidelines. Then create an account in GoGold, the online system for creating and submitting Gold Award proposals and final reports
Questions about GoGold? Check out the FAQ's
 

A successful project proposal includes:

  • a community issue and the root cause
  • the target audience
  • a clear project description
  • three or more goals to provide direction for your project
  • team members from several backgrounds with diverse skills (non-family members, community members, experts, and students, etc.)
  • clear action steps
  • a realistic timeline
  • how you'll reach the suggested 80 hours of planning and execution
  • who will sustain the project

Choosing a Project Advisor
As you work with your community, it is also important to identify a Project  Advisor, who is an adult outside of your troop who can provide guidance, expertise, and feedback throughout the project. Your Project Advisor may not be familiar with the Gold Award; you can use this letter template and this guide to share what the Gold Award is all about.

Remember: Girls that have graduated high school must submit their project proposals no later than the second Friday in June in the year they graduate. (Example: Girls who graduate in May 2020, must submit proposals no later than June 12. 2020). No exceptions.

Completing your Project
Before submitting your final report, review these Tips for Success

As you work on your project:

  • document your successes & challenges
  • continue to evaluate your plan and solutions
  • check-in with your Project Advisor and your Committee Liaison
  • reach out when you need help
  • email mewan@girlscoutsalaska.org if you need to report a problem

A Gold Award Project is complete when you:

  • have completed tasks stated in your proposal
  • ensure your project will be sustained by others for at least a year 
  • send your final report to your Committee Liaison for review
  • receive digital verification from your Project Advisor
  • submit a Final Report & receive approval from the Gold Award Committee

Remember: Girls that have graduated high school must complete and submit their final reports no later than the second Friday in Sepetember in the year they graduate. (Example: Girls who graduate in May 2020, have until Sept 11, 2020 to submit final reports). No exceptions.

Timelines & Deadlines

Proposals and Final Reports: Second Friday of each month (Reports received after the second Friday will be reviewed the next month)

Gold Award Proposal Interviews: Fourth Monday of each month

Young Women of Distinction 2020:

    Project Proposal: Winter 2019

    Final Reports: Spring 2020

(Reports received after these dates will be eligible for Young Women of Distinction 2021)

Graduating Seniors (no later than):

    Project Proposal: June 12th, 2020

    Final Report: September 11th, 2020

Gold Award Support Team

Troop Leaders

Click here for the Gold Award Guide for Leaders

Frequently Asked Questions

What is my role in the Gold Award?

You are your Girl Scout’s cheerleader, sounding board, proofreader, and advocate. It is her project, she will build it and she will be responsible for it. All communication will be directed at her and when possible will include her adult support team.

How much should I be involved?

Just enough to keep your Girl Scout supported and motivated. 

Please understand that sometimes a girl’s plan will get derailed, you can be instrumental in helping her get back on track with patience and understanding.

Who do I contact if I have questions about my girl’s Gold Award?

First contact your girl, she is the expert on her project. You may also contact her Gold Award Committee Liaison. If you still have questions, contact Maggie Ewan at mewan@girlscoutsalaska.org

 

Parents & Guardians

Click here for the Gold Award Guide for Adults

Frequently Asked Questions

What is my role in the Gold Award?

You are your Girl Scout’s cheerleader, sounding board, proofreader, and advocate. It is her project, she will build it and she will be responsible for it. All communication will be directed at her and when possible will include her adult support team.

How much should I be involved?

Just enough to keep your Girl Scout supported and motivated. 

Please understand that sometimes a girl’s plan will get derailed, you can be instrumental in helping her get back on track with patience and understanding.

Who do I contact if I have questions about my girl’s Gold Award?

First contact your girl, she is the expert on her project. You may also contact her Gold Award Committee Liaison. If you still have questions, contact Maggie Ewan at mewan@girlscoutsalaska.org

 

Project Advisors

Click here for the Gold Award Guide for Project Advisors

Project Advisors are an important part of a girl's Gold Award Team. They are an adult expert on the issue. They  will share expertise, access to resources, and other professional knowledge.

Past Project Advisors include social workers, teachers, nurses, directors and staff at local organizations and businesses, coaches and more. They should NOT be a family member or troop leader.

Gold Award Committee

Gold Award Committee members are Girl Scout volunteers who are dedicated to helping every girl pursuing her Gold Award to reach her goal. Committee members review and approve proposals and final reports, conduct interviews, and support girls throughout the Gold Award process.

Girls will be assigned a Committee Liaison who will provide support, answer questions, and will review final reports before submission.

Interested in joining the committee? Email mewan@girlscoutsalaska.org

Truly Remarkable

2020-2021 Gold Award Girl Scouts

Krista S., Kodiak – While working as a Student Conservation Association (SCA) volunteer Krista saw firsthand the effect of trash and marine debris on Kodiak beaches. Her experience inspired her to better educate students in her community about the impact of marine debris. Krista partnered with NOAA, Island Trails Network, and local schools to organize beach clean ups and to develop lesson plans, virtual field trips, and marine debris art kits.

Amara S., Juneau - After a health emergency, Amara's family to switched from the Standard American Diet to a Plant Based Diet and found they were healthier physically, mentally, and emotionally. Amara noticed that many of her peers did not know what a plant based diet is or how their eating habits affected their health, so she worked with the Contemporary Cuisine teacher at her high school to developed a plant based diet unit. Students learned the benefits and how to plan, prepare, and cook plant based meals. Her unit has been added into the curriculum and will continue to be taught to future students.

Kasey Z., Anchorage - Kasey noticed a lack of engagement between elders and teenagers, so she created a partnership between the Anchorage Senior Center and the King Tech High School cosmetology program. Students provided manicures which allowed them to practice their nail technician skills, talk with the senior citizens, and help them with self-care. Kasey saw that the senior citizens were very excited to get their nails done and enjoyed interacting with the high schoolers. Many were interested in going to the school to have services done when they are able.

Daisy K., Homer – Daisy rallied youth and adults in her community to become more aware of the urgent issues related to the environment and climate change. She established a local chapter of Alaska Youth for Environmental Action, educated students and voters on the Homer bag ban ordnance and plastic spork ban at Homer High School, testified at Kenai Borough assembly meetings in favor of establishing a Climate Commission, and organized a climate rally as part of the Global Youth Climate Strike.

2019-2020 Gold Award Girl Scouts

Leesa M., Petersburg  – Leesa worked with the Petersburg Borough to design and build a life jacket stand at the Blaquiere Boat Launch. She also hosted a water safety event where people learned the importance of water safety equipment & how to properly put on a life jacket.

Jilliana M., Eagle River – Jilliana worked with the Armed Services YMCA (ASYMCA) at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson to renovate their After 5 Boutique, a boutique that loans formal wear to military families. Jilliana also worked with the thrift store and military spouses group to rotate the available items to keep it up-to-date. The ASYMCA noticed an increased in visitors after the redesign and customers were very happy with the new look.

Tia K. Eagle River - Tia organized donation drives and fundraisers to create "Party Packs" for a local food pantry. The party packs include cake mix, frosting, and other party supplies. The Chugiak High School Key Club will be continuing to create and donate the party packs.

Allison W., Sitka - Allison started a Best Buddies club at Sitka High School. Best Buddies is dedicated to enhancing the lives of people with intellectual and development disabilities but creating one-to-one friendships. 

Aileia C., Wasilla - Aileia organized her community to beautify a local park. Through the process, community members learned how to get involved within their community and are excited to host events at the improved park. 

2018-2019 Gold Award Girl Scouts

Allyson B. JBER - Created toy bins for three age groups on the Ramstein Air Base in Germany that can be checked out to help military families moving overseas with young children. The bins help make one area of a move a little less stressful for military families.

Carolyn P., JBER - Researched the high school graduation requirements of all 50 states, Washington D.C., and Department of Defense schools, then created a PDF and distributed the information to a variety of military organizations.

Kayla R., Eagle River - Worked with Eagle River Parks and Recreation to build a sign kiosk for the Mirror Lake Trail system. 

Avery H., Petersburg - Worked with the Petersburg Indian Association and US Forest Service to organize a Tlingit Culture Camp.

Quinn W., Anchorage - Developed and taught journalism classes at an Anchorage elementary school. 

2017-2018 Gold Award Girl Scouts

Julia M., Petersburg – Worked with the Petersburg, AK Parks and Recreation department to create a map of all of the walking/hiking trails near town. 

Maggie J., Anchorage – Developed and led an arts workshop for an Anchorage elementary school.

Anessa F., Anchorage – Developed a mentorship program at her high school to help connect students with educational resources.

Anna M., Anchorage – Coordinated a clothing and art supply drive for the refugee population in Belgium. Planned and taught art programs to refugee youth at a community center in Belgium. 

Questions? Contact Maggie at mewan@girlscoutsalaska.org